mammoths

Woolly mammoths are making a comeback. Should we eat them?

And what hairy beast, its hour come at last, slouches towards a laboratory to be born? Some 3,900 years ago, on mainland Siberia, the last known woolly mammoth breathed its last. Since then, humans have known mammoths only through their remnants: scattered bones and a small number of frozen carcasses, complete with the tatty remnants …

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Bones of Mammoths Seemingly Butchered by Humans Found in New Mexico

The bones of a mammoth and calf recently uncovered in New Mexico show signs of butchering, an exciting find that could help refine estimates of when humans first populated the Americas. The specimens date to between 36,250 and 38,900 years ago, according to carbon dating analysis of the bones’ collagen. The paleontological team found blunt-force …

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New Mexico mammoths among best evidence for early humans in North America

The remains of two mammoths discovered in New Mexico show that humans lived in North America much earlier than thought. Credit: NPS. About 37,000 years ago, a mother mammoth and her calf met their end at the hands of human beings. Bones from the butchering site record how humans shaped pieces of their long bones …

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